recovery

Recovery Of Rescue Kitten Makes Volunteers Get Creative

Recovery for some rescue animals can be a slow and painful procedure, both for them and for the volunteers. It can take long visits to the vet, extra care, and waiting. Waiting can exhaust you so much to the point that you forget what you are going to all this trouble for.




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Chance’s x-ray after the surgery and his adorable outfit gave him the nickname Robocat.

Chance was in terrible pain and apart for that, he was he was a wild one.

Chance’s Rescue

Chance is a kitten that recovers slow. So very slow. He was a stray and was found by one of SCARS volunteers suffering in terrible pain after his two front, tiny legs had been broken to pieces – probably by a hit and run.

Chance was in terrible pain and apart for that, he was he was a wild one. Very difficult to handle, he had to be sedated in order to be examined by the vet. Both his legs needed surgery and Chance had a long and painful recovery in front of him.

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Chance sunbathing in blue, while his crate is being cleaned.

He is taken out twice per day and allowed small walks in the room while his crate is being cleaned

Chance’s Recovery

For weeks Chance has been living in a crate, receiving constant care every day. The cast around his tiny legs makes it very difficult for him to maneuver, and that makes him even more upset. He is taken out twice per day and allowed small walks in the room while his crate is being cleaned.

His left front leg recovered faster and Chance was freed from the bandages. His right one needed a longer recovery, and needs to be changed twice per week.

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Chance in red – his fourth change.

The first change from blue to red happened by chance – there was no blue available so we went for red. And then the fun started.

The Changes

Keeping a kitten in a crate for so long is not easy. Having to take the poor thing to the vet twice per week to change his bandages is not easy either. What started out as a “oh no, not again” changed once we realized how adorably cute Chance looked in his “outfit”. The first change from blue to red happened by chance – there was no blue available so we went for red. And then the fun started.

After realizing that Chance would have to go through all that again and again, we started looking for different colors. Apart from the fun of watching and photographing him in different “outfits” every week, we also needed to update his album on the Facebook page. That would not be easy having him wear the same color again and again – for the same reason why TV anchors need to change suits, otherwise you’ll believe that today’s news are just a playback of yesterday’s broadcast.

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My personal favorite, yellow.

 

for the same reason why TV anchors need to change suits, otherwise you’ll believe that today’s news are just a playback of yesterday’s broadcast.

The Fun

So Chance has changed six times already, and he’s gone from blue in both legs to red in both legs, to blue again in one leg, then red again, then yellow, then orange, then green and for his last change we are desperately looking for purple! Being in rescue is not easy, so having fun with an animal’s recovery makes it all easier and funnier – and volunteers need to laugh (no, we do not spend our nights holding our pillows and crying!)

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Supercat in orange.

Chance is not the wild kitten he used to be. He turned out to be a loving, tender kitten that loves to have his belly rubbed and seeks human presence and attention.

Chance Today

Today Chance is much better. He’s in green, he feels better and his recovery is going well. The possibility of losing his legs has vanished. One other positive thing that has come out of it all is that Chance, after being treated, moved from the crate to the room and then back to the crate and dragged to the vet every other day is not the wild kitten he used to be. He turned out to be a loving, tender kitten that loves to have his belly rubbed and seeks human presence and attention.

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Loverboy today, in green

He has also been reserved and will join his new family once he has fully recovered. For updates on him, please visit the charity’s Facebook page or contact SCARS at: info@scars.gr. You can also donate via PayPal at: donate@scars.gr



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